A Freelancer’s Guide To…Collaboration

A Freelancer’s Guide To…Collaboration

Collaboration is more than just working together. For example, a training provider and a venue is more of a partnership, a client/supplier relationship. Whereas, a collaboration is so much more exciting. It’s where a group or an individual team up to produce something and achieve a common goal which would never have been achieved without that co-operation. It’s the process of pooling knowledge, resources and relationships for the sake of pursuing shared aims, where everyone shares the reward or loss of the venture. For example, instead of author commissioning an artist to illustrate their book, how about an artist and a writer coming together to create a graphic novel? That’s a collaboration! Bringing people and businesses together and then igniting and nurturing a collaborative effort, is something we proactively support at Cambridge Business Lounge. The opportunity for a start-up to create something fantastically new with the support of others can be invaluable to any start-up who are trying to find their feet. Here are a few examples of to demonstrate how it worked for others… Victoria Arnold, Desk Union: We were keen to collaborate with another start-up, Desk Unions booking software, rather than buy an off the shelf package or have something developed from scratch. We identified a fellow Scottish start-up called Appointedd who had just launched an online booking software for salons and spas. Together, we co-developed Desk Union’s booking software over 3 months. The end result means an awesome affordable software for us, an opportunity for Appointedd to try white-labelling, and two happy startups. It’s a win-win! We always try to collaborate rather than reinvent the wheel. Ann Hawkins, Business Coach, Speaker, Trainer and Mentor:...
A Freelancer’s Guide To…Accountants

A Freelancer’s Guide To…Accountants

We’ve all been there; you have a great idea or product and all you want to do is find customers, that’s all. Few people go into a business for the paperwork – unless you’re a Virtual Administrator, of course. And the thought of talking to an accountant is often even further removed from the minds of new business owners. However, the right support can so often make a difference between a successful and unsuccessful business, and an accountant can be one the most valuable ports of call that you have, and here’s why… Why Does My New Business Need An Accountant? Will you start trading as a limited company or sole trader? Should you be VAT registered? What taxes will you be liable for? How does corporation tax work? What impact does VAT MOSS have on my business? What documentation should you keep track of and how? And, what do you need to know to set up your business that you don’t know now? It is these questions that you will need answers to and, as Elaine Clark, MD of the award-winning Cheap Accounting, says“not seeking advice from the offset can often prove to be a false economy” What Else Will An Accountant Do For Me? Accountants are known for being tax experts and supporting both businesses and individuals on Self-Assessment, VAT, PAYE, Year End and more. In my opinion, an accountant should be a professional friend and confidante for a business. Elaine goes on to state that, like a friend, an accountant will stand with you throughout “It’s not just about today and what needs to be done at start...
Starting a Freelance Business? Learn How To Move Your Rock

Starting a Freelance Business? Learn How To Move Your Rock

Are your comfortable? Then let me begin…   One morning, a boy was playing in his sandbox with his box of cars and trucks, his plastic bucket, and a shiny, red plastic shovel. In the process of creating roads and tunnels, he discovered a large rock in the middle of the sandbox and, with a little bit of struggle, he pushed and nudged the large rock across the sandbox by using his feet.   However, when the boy got the rock to the edge of the sandbox, he found that he couldn’t roll it up and over the wall.   Determined, the boy shoved, pushed, and pried, but every time he thought he had made some progress, the rock tipped and then fell back into the sandbox.   All this time the boy’s father watched from his living room window as the drama unfolded and, at the moment his tears fell, a large shadow fell across the boy and the sandbox.   Gently, but firmly, the father said, “Son, why didn’t you use all the strength that you had available?” Defeated, the boy sobbed back, “But I did, Daddy, I did! I used all the strength that I had!”   “No, son,” corrected the father kindly. “You didn’t use all the strength you had. You didn’t ask me.” and, with that, the father reached down, picked up the rock and removed it from the sandbox. Why did I tell you this? Well, because gettting started on growing a new business can be a challenge. We all have our skills for which customers will pay us for, but what about...