A Freelancer’s Guide To… Getting Press Coverage

A Freelancer’s Guide To… Getting Press Coverage

A key part of promoting the news of a business is with press coverage. Journalist and PR blogger, Janet Murray, explains how you get journalists to write about you in their magazine or newspaper and how can you secure a spot on radio or TV… Decide where you’d like press coverage Start by making a list of the publications or programmes you’d like coverage in. This needs to be strategic; you may love reading the Sunday Telegraph, but if your ideal customers read the Daily Mail, your efforts could be wasted. So do spend some time finding out what your ideal customers watch read and listen to before you finalise your shortlist. Get contact details for relevant editors and journalists Many publications list names and contact details for journalists inside (known as the masthead) and email addresses are also sometimes included. If they’re not, you can usually work out the email format by looking at an address that is listed (contacts for advertising sales usually are). Radio and TV producers and researchers are sometimes listed online – or can be found on social networks like Twitter – but it’s usually quicker to ring up and ask. Don’t bother with generic email addresses (e.g. news@ or features@) as, in many cases these are not checked regularly.  There are subscription-based services out there that list journalists’ contact details like Gorkana or Response Source, but they are pricey and not always as up-to-date as they should be. If in doubt, just pick up the phone. Write an email pitch or press release If you’re trying to get coverage in a regional publication or programme, it’s a good idea...
Stop Calling Yourself a Solopreneur!

Stop Calling Yourself a Solopreneur!

All too often, I come across meaningless professional labels, such as techpreneur, solopreneur, and my least favourite of them all: mumpreneur.  For the purpose of this blog, I want to focus on “Solopreneur” which, according to Google, is “a person who sets up and runs a business on their own.” If this is you, I get it, you run your own business and there are no colleagues or employees to answer to. Your job title could even be “OEO – Only Executive Officer”. In spite of all this, you’re not alone. I repeat, NOT alone. Not now, not ever. Sure, it might feel like you are, but you’re not. When you start a business, you rely on paying clients, the people who interact with your enewsletters, and the people you don’t even know who share your stuff with their network or on social media.  Let’s not forget there are also business mentors and networking groups.  There ain’t nothing ‘solo’ about you or your work. In May 2016, I launched “Freelance Heroes” which is full of UK Freelancers sharing ideas, empathy, and experiences. As one member put it, some good old fashioned accountability. Cambridge Business Lounge, a coworking space where people come to work out of in a shared office environment, is another example of people working for themselves but not by themselves. One member of our community, Caroline Broad of Broad Associates, explained coworking as “networking, some company and support, whilst building a viable business” Forget meaningless labels.  You own a business and you make money and while you may be the Only Executive Officer, master of your own domain, you...