Featured Freelancer: David Dean, Psychologist

Featured Freelancer: David Dean, Psychologist

I met a freelancer once, many years ago, who used to leave his house at 8:30 in the morning, dressed for work, walk around the block via a coffee shop, and then enter his house again about 15mins later. Now he was at work and is only allowed to carry out work related tasks. At the end of each day, he did the reverse journey. At the time I thought this was remarkable, yet when I became a freelancer and opened a coworking space, I got it. The importance of managing your own mind set when work and home is in the same building can never be underestimated. Why do I bring this up?  Because the importance of a “commute” as a freelancer based from home is just one of the lessons learnt by this week’s Featured Freelancer. What follows is the rest of his story following 5 years of being a freelancer. Enjoy… What is your name, where are you based, and what do you do? My name is David Dean and I am a psychologist based in Impington, Cambridge. My role is support private clients and organisations with career, professional and personal development coaching and business learning. Coupled with this, I work with a number of UK university business schools coaching and mentoring MBA and MSc Business students. Whilst also lecturing & teaching on many career & business/organisational psychology related topics. Lastly, I help people and organisations who want to start to work from/in or at home. It’s always been a fascinating area of psychology, into how people negotiate the transition to working in a place that is...
Featured Freelancer: Rachel Shenton, Video Editor

Featured Freelancer: Rachel Shenton, Video Editor

If you knew how much admin was involved in running your own freelance business, would you still have done it? I suspect that if I polled this question, the answer would still be a resounding “yes”. Yet it’s this lesson, along with so many others, that every freelancer has to learn when they start out. Not only that, but many challenges come as a complete surprise until we’re faced with them. Here are this week’s Featured Freelancers’ lessons and the story of her freelancing journey… What is your name, where are you based, and what do you do? My name is Rachel, I currently live in County Durham, and I’m a freelance video editor.   How long have you been freelancing and why did you decide to become a freelancer? I’ve been freelancing for around five years, and it was something I really just fell into! I had been editing videos for around five years before that, until I got talking to someone who worked for a production company and I started working for them as a freelancer, all because they liked some of the fan-videos I’d put together. It was pure luck.   What support did you have from family and friends? Did anyone advise you against becoming freelance? I had always been aware of the fact that freelancers are typically financially insecure, that it’s a risky thing to do etc., but at the time there were very few jobs to be had around where I lived – certainly not many creative jobs – so it really seemed to be the best way of working and gaining experience...
Featured Freelancer: Natalie Lek, Freelance PA

Featured Freelancer: Natalie Lek, Freelance PA

I met Natalie first through a LinkedIn post of hers, where she was crowdfunding to be able to buy and make Christmas Dinner for 1000 familes who are homeless, unable to afford their own, ex-services, etc. It was such an extraordinary and selfless thing to do, to give up Christmas to help others, that I was intrigued to find out more about the person behind the project. As it turns out, Natalie has been a freelancer for 17 and, as a result, this is the story of her freelancing journey. What is your name, where are you based, and what do you do? My name is Natalie Lek. I have my own freelance PA business, Angel PA, based in Greater Manchester and deliver social change through various social actions projects, which are delivered under the banner of The Launch Project. How long have you been freelancing and why did you decide to become a freelancer? I have been a freelancer for 18 years now and the reason I became a freelancer was due to having my children. It was very clear to me from early on that the financial situation of the country at that time, in relation to earnings as an employee, was not going to provide for my family and that becoming freelance was the only way forward as a single parent.  It also offered flexibility which when you have young children is something that is needed. What support did you have from family and friends? Did anyone advise you against becoming freelance? Good question, I think that back then the prospect of a single parent becoming...
How to Get The Most From Facebook or Linkedin Groups

How to Get The Most From Facebook or Linkedin Groups

“Helping others is the way we help ourselves” – Oprah Winfrey When a new Business Park opened in Cambridge, the managing company of the site decided to host a “Meet the Neighbour” networking event, allowing residents of the park to see who is based around them and what they do. Come the evening of the event, it seemed like ¾ of attendees were based anywhere but the Business Park and were looking to meet residents in the hope of signing them up as customers. Now take a Facebook Group such as Freelance Heroes (obviously!) and you’ll be amazed how many people try to join it in the hope of signing up any of the 2000+ members as customers. Needless to say, those people aren’t allowed in. If you’re joining a Facebook Group, LinkedIn Group or forum, related to an industry type, geographical location, or other topic, follow these steps to get the most out of it. Read the Rules In each group there will most likely be a description from the person who set it up, detailing who the group is for and the nature of behaviour in the group. This will help you to integrate with existing members most effectively and show that you’re there for the same reasons as them. What if there’s no description? I’ll come back to that. * Learn From Existing Posts But reading what has been allowed in, and their respective comments, you’ll be able to see first-hand what works best in the group, ensuring your posts and comments compliment what’s there. Comment before Posting It’s not your job to tell other people...
Why You Need To Get Involved in #MicroBizMatters Day 2018

Why You Need To Get Involved in #MicroBizMatters Day 2018

Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face – Mike Tyson Search the internet for “Small Business Support UK” and Google will throw back almost 9 million results and, no doubt, much of it is very valuable in your drive to plan the future success for your business. But, as Freelance Heroes proves time and time again, the most valuable support comes from those who have walked in the same shoes as you. And with over 5 million micro-business owners in the UK there’s a good chance you’ve walked past, held the door open for, and connected on social media with a micro business owner today already. Where does your peers support come from? With all this planning you do, who do you turn to when you get “punched in the face”? On Friday 12th January 2018, Micro Business owners come together for the 3rd annual MicroBizMattersDay, the world’s biggest, annual, social media enterprise extravaganza. The day is organised by, run by and for micro (0-9 employees and under £2 million turnover) business owners everywhere. During the intense day of Recognition, Action, and Learning, there is even more practical help, from thousands of real businesses, that has ever been sought or given. It’ll also trend on Twitter for close to, if not over twelve hours, yet again. So, how can you get involved, especially if you can’t make it to XYZ Social & Works, which is the home of MicroBizMattersDay for this year? Here are 4 ways… 1. Watch the learning hours online via microbizmattersday.rocks, as well as live streaming on the event’s Facebook and YouTube channels. Freelance Hereos...