Lazy Marketing: Your Small Business is Better Than This

Lazy Marketing: Your Small Business is Better Than This

“You can’t buy happiness but you can buy local, and that’s kind of the same” – Unknown   I’m sure you’ve all seen the sign outside a small retailer: When you buy from a small business, you are not helping a CEO buy a third holiday home. You are helping a little girl get dance lessons, a little boy get his team jersey, Mums & Dads put food on the table. Thanks for shopping local. Read my articles, attend a training session of mine, or come to my coworking space and you’ll see that I’m a big fan of small business in the UK. In fact, supporting and empowering small businesses in the face of competition from larger corporations is central to what I professionally believe in and what I do every day. Therefore, you’d think that because of this, and because most of my clients are freelancers and small businesses, I’d agree with this sentiment whole-heartedly. Well, you’re wrong. Every time I see this sign, I could cry. And here’s why: 1. Can we deal with the needless gender stereotyping first? Good, thank you. 2. I’m pretty sure the 500,000 employees of Tesco, many of whom rely on the wage the supermarket provides, would have an issue with this statement. 3. What happens if we all follow this post and only buy from small shops? Small shops that now get bigger as a result and will then need to employ more staff, move to bigger premises, etc. When do we stop buying from them, because we’ll have to, as the CEO of this once-small shop is now doing...
What is a Freelance Hero?

What is a Freelance Hero?

“If you support the community, they will support you” – Jerry Greenfield, Co-Founder of Ben & Jerrys. I’ve written about why I started Freelance Heroes on numerous occasions. However, if you don’t know the story then it’s probably best explained in this Positive Sparks podcast “Why True & Open Sharing Is the Secret to My Facebook Group Success”, from May 2017. This is breif thought about the impact of the group since it started. Annie and I have little control over the growth of the group, other than rejecting those who aren’t from or based in the UK and others who are typically joining so they can sell into the group, but many continue to recommend the community to their peers, which has seen it grow faster and faster with each passing month. For example, in September 2017 there were 1250 freelancers in the group (16 months after it started). Fast forward just 6 months and that had doubled to over 2500. From day one, questions have covered all aspects of freelancing and that hasn’t changed. In the last week alone, these include: How do you stay resilient as a freelancer? Tag Lines… How many of you have them/ use them? & Do you think they add anything when it comes to creating your Facebook / Instagram pages and website? Does anyone have a free Marketing Strategy/Plan template they would be willing to share with me? Anyone used a WordPress live chat plugin on their website? As well as questions and conversations on awkward clients, late payments, imposter syndrome, and more. And every time a question is asked, dozens...
Featured Freelancer: Sarah Carter, Photographer

Featured Freelancer: Sarah Carter, Photographer

When you see a friend start a business, you feel a sense of joy and anticipation, and also ask a number of questions you don’t tend to ask of others: Is this a good idea? Will they succeed? Are they the right person to do this? In the case of this week’s Featured Freelancer, the answer is Yes, Yes, and Yes. Like the journey of most other Freelancers, it’s not always been plain sailing. Especially when it comes to the paperwork. Here is this week’s story. Enjoy!   What is your name, where are you based, and what do you do? My Name is Sarah Carter and I am a Photographer based in Bourne, Lincolnshire.   How long have you been freelancing and why did you decide to become a freelancer? I gave up my last job when my little boy was born, 3 years ago, as I couldn’t afford to go to work and pay child care. I would have been working 8am-8pm and traveling to get there and back. I just couldn’t find child care for those times. I had always done photography in the background as a hobby but never as my job. So I then had a choice: go back to a job I really didn’t like and miss out with my little boy or do something I love as well as work as and when I want to. I started doing weddings and events 2 years ago and now have a studio that I love, where I do family portraits and product photography. The last few months has brought more commercial work my way...