Dealing With Your Social Media Mistakes

Dealing With Your Social Media Mistakes

“I was born to make mistakes not to fake perfection.” – Drake I recently wrote a blog, “How to Deal With the Bad and Ugly Comments on Social Media”, which looked at how to deal with the any negative comments that you may receive on your social media pages. But what if you’re the one making the faux pas? How do you come back from that? In this instance, I’m not talking about grammatical errors or using too many hashtags. That’s for another post. Firstly, remember that you’re only human. Most of the mistakes I come across are extremely small and stem from having the confidence to try stuff out.  In many cases, mistakes can humanise our businesses, which add to the story and personality that we’re trying to convey. Waitrose One of my favourite examples, included in  – which also highlights that these things happen to big brands as well as small ones – comes from the supermarket chain, Waitrose. In September 2012, they invited their twitter followers to finish this sentence “I shop at Waitrose because…” The idea of the exercise was to encourage customers to praise their shops, e.g. their service or range of products. What they received was largely anything but that and the tweets that followed included: “I shop at Waitrose because Clarrisa’s pony just WILL NOT eat ASDA Value straw.” “I shop at Waitrose because I don’t like being surrounded by poor people.” “I shop at Waitrose because the toilet paper is made from 24ct gold thread. (Unless it’s the Essentials range)” “I shop at Waitrose because I want to prove to Jeremy Kyle...
How to Deal With Any Negative Comments on Your Social Media

How to Deal With Any Negative Comments on Your Social Media

“Disaster gave me two things: a moment to react and a decision to overcome” – Michael Dooley, NYTimes Bestselling Author and Entrepreneur. I read an article this week from Inc.com contributor Jessica Stillman, entitled “How to Bounce Back from a Social Media Disaster”. It reminded me of an increasing number of stories of epic social media fails that happen from people who forget they’re on a global network, or from people who should just steer clear of social media. The particular one that stands out, which I included in my book and still use on training courses today, comes from the beautiful city of Bath, in the West of England. The story goes like this… In February 2014, a woman visited a deli in Bath for a cake and coffee. After her visit, she left the following feedback on the deli’s Facebook page: “The cakes looked amazing and I wanted to try every single one BUT the cakes were on very open display with every customer essentially leaning over them to order.” She added “”So, all the cakes were getting breathed on (or worse) by every single passing person, plus the staff. Which is a crying shame as they really did look extremely good. But due to the above, we just had coffee.” The sensible response from the deli would have been to accept the feedback as it was intended, i.e. constructive and good natured, and respond with words such as “Thank you for your feedback which we’ve taken on board and have now bought covers for the cakes. We hope you come back and try them soon.” However,...
Social Media Is, And Always Has Been, Free. Or Is It?

Social Media Is, And Always Has Been, Free. Or Is It?

“Nothing in the world is free” – My Dad There are many reasons why the adoption of Social Media, as we know it today, was so rapid: e.g. Easy access – mobile technology, increase in Wi-Fi and 3G coverage, etc. The concept of sharing is deeply ingrained within us One of the other reasons, of course, is that social media is – and always has been – free. Or is it? Of course, I know you get that creating a Facebook page or group is free. Signing up to Twitter is free. Pinterest, Instagram, LinkedIn are all… free! However, I want you to consider this for a moment: How much do you invoice your customers for your time? £400 a day? £900? More? Let’s work on the lower end of that amount, for the purpose of this blog. Now, how much time do you spend, on average, on your social media activity each day? 1 hour? More? If you spend an hour a day on your social media activity (either collectively or in one go) and charge £400 a day, then one week on social media amounts to a minimum of £200 a week of non billable time.* Do you still think social media is free? In any downturn of a business, and every business has one, you need to justify the expense of all areas to a business, either to yourself or the number crunchers. That’s easily done for time spent on sales or the billable work that is charged to a customer. But how do you justify your time spent planning and delivering good social media content?...
The Quality Rule of Social Media

The Quality Rule of Social Media

When you’re sourcing content that you what to share on social media, remember that “quality beats quantity”. I guest that many of you want to consistently post articles, links, etc., and there are some great scheduling apps to help you to do this, but it also has to be valuable to your audience. For example, quality content is: Entertaining, Educational, or Empowering, and definitely, Relevant to your audience Also, and quite often, social media accounts will post links to sites in the belief that it’s all ‘relevant content’ because of the headline. But how relevant is it really? This may sound obvious, but take time to read the posts that have been suggested to you, or appear to you when searching for keywords, rather than blindly adding them as social media content. If not, you could be sharing content that’s either unhelpful or is poor quality, and which could impact how your followers perceive your knowledge or experience. Quality is not what you put into your social media activity; it is what your audience gets out of it. Action Point Focus on sharing the best content – rather than any content, simply because it’s quick and could double the number of social media posts that you make. Add your own comment to the post or tweet – that explains why you’re posting it and why it’s relevant to your...
The Unique Benefit of Social Media

The Unique Benefit of Social Media

Did you join any social network to be sold to? I didn’t think so. I’ve not met anyone who has and I doubt that I ever will. Yet, every day, my timelines and newsfeeds are littered with people who only talk about the services or products they sell. If that’s you, then you need to have a rethink of your strategy. For a start, that’s not what your audience is looking for. Your audience wants to know who you are, the personality behind your brand, what you stand for, etc. Imagine going to a dinner party and coming across someone who stands there and rabbles on about how great they are. How long would you give it before making an excuse to get as far away as you can? The audience you’re trying to reach on social media are no different, and will feel the same if you’re not careful. As Digital Analyst and Author, Brian Solis, brilliantly wrote “Social Media has more to do with sociology and anthropology that technology.” More than any aspect of social media, the words I find myself emphising more than any others are “social” and “engaging”. It’s  also what makes social media stand out amongst other marketing platforms. The wonderful thing about social media is that it gives you the opportunity to put yourself out there and create meaningful engagement with your audience. But in order to be likeable, you need to provide good, quality content, engage with respondents, and be smart about how you do it. Action Point Plan your content and activility to ensure that you’re more empowering, educational, even entertaining, Search...